BienDong.Net

Hanoi Sinks Russia's Plans for Vietnamese Naval Base

The Vietnamese Foreign Ministry stated Thursday that it would not allow foreign countries to set up military bases on its territory.

The announcement was perceived as a response to Russian Deputy Defense Minister Nikolai Pankov, who said last week that Russia was considering reopening bases in Vietnam and Cuba. [READ MORE]

South China Sea Disputes Are On Duterte's China Agenda Ahead of Visit, But to What Ends?

Speaking on Monday, Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte told an audience of local government officials that the country should not “dwell on Scarborough Shoal.”

According to a translation of his Tagalog remarks posted by Rappler, Duterte said the Philippines should not dwell “because we don’t have the capabilities.” “Even if we express anger, it will just amount to nothing. We can’t back it up,” Duterte added. [READ MORE]

Behind Duterte’s Bluster, a Philippine Shift Away From the U.S.

MANILA — President Rodrigo Duterte has vowed to expel American troops from the Philippines, accused the C.I.A. of plotting to kill him and insulted President Obama with an obscenity.

But beyond the blasts of hyperbole — he recently compared himself to Hitler — lies a real and potentially historic shift in Philippines foreign policy. [READ MORE]

Russia Seeks to Reopen Military Bases in Vietnam and Cuba

MOSCOW — Russia is working to re-establish its former military bases in Vietnam and Cuba, a senior official said on Friday, reflecting Moscow’s growing ambition to reassert itself on the world stage.

The official, Deputy Defense Minister Nikolai A. Pankov, spoke at the national Parliament shortly before lawmakers voted to ratify an agreement with Syria to make the Russian military presence there permanent. [READ MORE]

Majority of Chinese Worry Territorial Disputes Could Bring Military Conflict

The Pew Research findings released Wednesday came from a selection of questions asked to more than 3,000 Chinese people earlier this year.

China has been locked in a long-running dispute with countries such as the Philippines and Indonesia over territorial claims in the South China Sea. The Hague’s Permanent Court of Arbitration ruled against China's claim to nearly all of the area in July. [READ MORE]

Why ASEAN is in Disarray in the South China Sea

Once celebrated as a model multilateral organization and an agent of positive regional change, the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) is in disarray.

On July 12, a tribunal at the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague issued a judgment on the South China Sea that is widely seen as a victory for ASEAN member the Philippines over China.

An End to U.S.-Philippine Defense Cooperation?

“This year would be the last,” Rodrigo Duterte, the president of the Philippines, said Friday of the countries’ joint military exercises.

Addressing the U.S. directly, he said: “For as long as I am there, do not treat us like a doormat because you’ll be sorry for it. I will not speak with you. I can always go to China.” [READ MORE]

China–Vietnam relations: past sovereignty and sea

Geopolitics is often seen through a telescopic lens: with intense focus in one spot with the rest entirely out of view. That often seems to happen to nations’ relations with China.

The US and China are a good example. Much of the conventional wisdom says that they’re competing for hegemony in Southeast Asia and, if you listen to Donald Trump, over trade. [READ MORE]

America Rising: Indispensable Again in Asia

The conventional wisdom in recent years has been that the United States, reeling from loss of prestige after the Iraq invasion and awash in the foreign policy uncertainty that it created, is overextended and exhausted and now fated to watch impotently as China takes its place.

The thesis of American decline, first developed in the 1970s after the United States lost the Vietnam War, was back in vogue. America was not only fading but unable to prevent the arrival of a new Chinese superpower ready and eager to assume pre-eminence and leadership in a region dominated by the United States since the end of the Second World War. [READ MORE]

How the US got outplayed in the Asia-Pacific

In the waning days of the Obama administration, the worm may be turning regarding the US military’s welcome in Asia. Indeed, the Obama foreign policy brain trust may be underestimating China’s diplomatic leverage and skill, and overestimating its own.

The current trends are not auspicious for the US. Indeed, we may be seeing a slow but sure seismic shift in US political standing in the region. [READ MORE]

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